How To Steam Your Clothes |Steaming Polyester & More

How To Steam Your Clothes |Steaming Polyester & More

alarna hope using a clothing steamer and teaching how to steam your clothes

If you’re sick of ironing – let me help! In this post, I teach you how to steam your clothes and some helpful hints on steaming polyester, linen, wool, denim and more. Don’t forget to watch the video I made on it too!

 

If you’re wondering how to steam your clothes or if you should be steaming polyester or wool or any other common fabrics, then you’ve come to the right place!

I am a steaming wiz, a unique trait to be proud of – I know. If I ever started a gang, it would be a steamer gang. One that goes around town ditching peoples irons and converting them to a life of easy clothing care with the use of a steamer. I love them, so much actually that I have two. A handheld Russell Hobbs and a stand-alone Tefal and my iron are sitting in my laundry cupboard gathering dust.

I’ve had a steamer for about ten years now and I get asked questions about them all the time which is why I wanted to make this post to help you, whether you’re freshening up a pair of jeans or steaming polyester lining in your work jacket! A steamer is a fabulous tool that not only can replace most of your ironing (I know!) but is much more gentle on your clothing than whipping out that iron or heading to the dry cleaners.

What is a clothes steamer?

A clothing steamer is a tool used to get the creases out of your clothing and can even freshen up lesser washed items like denim jeans and knitwear. Clothing steamers are perfect for delicate fabrics and because they never actually touch your clothes, make it difficult for you to burn your items.

They can come in both handheld models (that look a bit like a scanning gun or small handheld vacuum cleaner, and a standing version. Most fashion stores, tailors and dry cleaners use the standing ones and there’s not a huge difference in price between the two. Personally, I use both – but I’ve got to say, since I got my Russell Hobbs handheld one I’ve been using that more than my stand-alone Tefal one.

Steaming Polyester, Denim, Linen & Other Fabrics

If you’re setting up your steamer and are unsure what fabrics you can steam – let me give you a quick rundown:

Steaming Polyester, Viscose & Other Synthetic Fabrics:

When you’re steaming fabrics that aren’t natural, it’s best to check the garment care tag first. If this gives you no indication of whether or not you can steam your garment then turn your garment inside out and hold your steamer about 20cms away from the fabric and test in an inconspicuous spot. I feel comfortable steaming polyester, viscose and blends of natural fabrics with elastic in them.

It’s best to avoid steaming fabrics that might watermark, or melt. These could be fabrics like suede, fake leather, sequined garments or clothing with beading.

Steaming cotton, linen, silk and wool:

Again, you should always read the clothing label first. Personally, I steam cotton, linen, silk and wool – especially my jeans and my jumpers between washes – it’s a great way to keep them fresh and avoid a spin in the machine.

If you want to watch a tutorial on how to steam your clothes – I made a video for you!

Alarna Hope

Alarna Hope is a fashion stylist and writer based in Sydney, she's considered an expert in her field as a personal stylist and is also quite good at writing about herself in the third person. She cries during movie makeover scenes, has a jar of Nutella under her bed for safety and can tell you the synopsis of every Kath and Kim episode ever. She currently resides in Sydney with her Oscar-worthy cat, Meryl Streep.

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